Arvida Byström


With her peachy-pink hair, doll-like features, and pastel wardrobe, it’s easy to entertain the fantasy that Arvida Byström lives in a magical realm where My Little Ponies run rampant and gelato is the only form of sustenance. But don’t be fooled—she’s not all glitter and gumdrops. The London/Stockholm-based model/artist/photographer—who starred in our Temp Drop Shop lookbook—has more to express than just the fact that she loves the color pink. With the shoots for ViceBon Magazine, along with some controversial performance art, Arvida is quickly establishing herself as a prominent, inspiringly feminist, voice in the art world. See some behind-the-scenes images from our shoot, find out every single color she’s dyed her hair, and get insight on her art.

Shantell Martin


(photos by Meghan Mcneer)

White walls, T-shirts, and toys beware, Shantell Martin is armed with a marker and she doesn’t consider any surface too sacred. If you aren’t familiar with her work, Shantell’s drawings can best be described as a visual stream of consciousness, “a language of words and lines.” To us, her illustrations, done mostly in black and white and spanning across large walls or covering found objects, are nothing short of stunning. We caught up with Shantell to talk grandma collabs, drawing where you shouldn’t, and why she kind of needs a spare pool right now. — Chris Rellas

The Queen’s English by Martine Syms and Cat Roif


Martine Syms has already taught us a lot about music and art. But today, we want to spread the word about one of her and photographer phenom Cat Roif‘s personal projects, because they’re doing some pretty cool stuff. From July 13 through August 31, Armory Center for the Arts will feature The Queen’s Englishan exhibition and reading room. The exhibition will explore black feminist communities in the ’70s and promote discussions on language and representation. In other words, this is cool stuff and you should go! The opening reception is this Saturday the 12th from 7:00 to 9:00 pm!


Artist Rosson Crow paints big, and thinks even bigger. Her large-scale artworks are drenched in color, bursting with energy, and vibrant with character and life…kinda like the artist herself.

In today’s Portrait of a #GIRLBOSS, Rosson talks about growing up in Texas, making art in New York, and why she listens to a lot of rap music while she works. She also discusses some of the challenges of being a woman in a male-dominated industry, and tells us why she’s all for making bad paintings. After all, says Rosson, “mistakes can be good” so long as you learn something from them. Spoken like a true #GIRLBOSS.

Did you see the last three #GIRLBOSS portraits? Go watch ’em all now!

Here some of Rosson’s art in case you are not familiar with her incredible work.


Let me be very clear that I live in a world where Kim Gordon needs no introduction, but for the 1% of you who were either born after 2005 or spent the entirety of the last 20 years camping in the bush in Western Australia, here is some background. (For the rest of you currently staring at your “I love Kim G” hand-collaged bedroom walls, my apologies). Born in Rochester, NY and bred in Los Angeles, CA, Gordon studied visual art at Otis before moving to New York City and becoming immersed in the underground/post-punk/noise music scene. It was there that she met Thurston Moore and Lee Ronaldo, and together they formed legendary no-wave band Sonic Youth in 1981. As guitarist, bassist, and vocalist for Sonic Youth, Gordon spent a few decades serving as the #1 girl crush of all the coolest girls in the world, someone how finding time in her busy shredding schedule to produce Hole’s first album Pretty On The Inside, co-direct The Breeders “Cannonball” video with pal Spike Jonze, and launch a (now defunct) cult clothing line called X-Girl (a favorite of the likes of Chloe Sevigny and Sofia Coppola), all the while continuing to create art in myriad forms.

Her latest endeavor is sort of the ideal marriage of music and art, an experimental noise band heavy on improvisation and deliberate visuals called Body/Head. At age 61, Kim Gordon is still a style icon and girl crush to the masses, and she is still creating her own world and playing by her own rules. She will always be a #GIRLBOSS in our books.

-Yasi Salek

Illustrator Seitaro Ito


Ever since we visited Japan, we’ve been obsessed with all things Tokyo. Thanks to some friends we met along the way (and serious internet stalking), we discovered illustrator Seitaro Ito—who created the iconic ’60s bombshell character Foxy—and knew we had to find out more about him. As it turns out, he’s BFFs with our go-to kawaii artist Esther Kim! The two met through mutual friends, and Seitaro said, “I was so happy when she said she liked my drawings because I also adore and respect her.” So, we thought we’d do the cutest thing possible: let them interview each other. Check out Esther’s Q&A with Seitaro below—and peep his killer Nasty Gal illustrations along the way.